What Does It Really Take to Become a Digital Nomad?

Become a Digital Nomad

Becoming a Digital Nomad: What It Really Takes – youtube

The ‘Digital Nomad‘ lifestyle sounds enticing right? Travel the world while working online with any number of skills in the digital workplace. To become a digital nomad is certainly possible.  While it’s totally possible to live a life of travel while working online, it’s best to not plunge into the Digital Nomad lifestyle without a good degree of preparation.

First of all, you need some digital skills you can offer. Anything from web design to copy writing to article writing to customer service. Second, you should already be making money from clients and hopefully repeat clients. You need to be making enough income to support the additional expense of traveling, add to that some buffer cash for any emergencies you may encounter on your travels.

Plunging starry-eyed into the nomadic digital lifestyle is a recipe for disaster.  A hard question you must ask yourself is do you really have the proper mindset, maturity and dedication to hard work to make this lifestyle work.

Working and traveling while providing any type of digital marketing requires a strong desire to learn, the willingness to edure loneliness, and be willing to be a marketer of yourself. You need to have a strong desire to be a Digital Nomad, – that means having a ‘fire in your soul’ and an incredible amount of motivation, discipline and drive.

become a digital nomad

 

 

How to Create an Awesome Resume If You Are a Remote Worker


 

 

Recent studies show that the ‘Remote Worker’ lifestyle is trending. If you are looking for more flexible work, now may be the time to refresh that resume…

Writing a good resume can be a tough and time-consuming process for most people. This statement is especially true when it comes to creating an effective resume for a remote work opportunity.

Most remote workers find it hard to develop an outstanding resume due to various reasons. It could be fear of failure, lack of effective writing skills, or the poor research they’ve done on the company they’re looking to join.

To land the perfect job position as a remote worker, you’ll need to bring complexity to the table. In today’s post, we’re approaching several strategies and tips that’ll help you create an amazing resume as a remote worker.


1. Chose an Outstanding Format

Before you actually get to the practical part and start writing your resume, you’ll have to choose the format that will suit you best. There are three types of formatting:

  • Chronological- listing the information in a chronological order
  • Functional- listing the information in accordance with your skills, abilities, and achievements
  • Hybrid- it’s a combination of chronological and functional formats

Moreover, you must also acknowledge and understand that recruiters won’t spent much time reading your resume. Therefore, you’d better keep it short, concise, and truly relevant. Also, choose a professional and readable font type and size. The recommended ones are Arial and Calibri at 10.5 or 12 size value.

2. List Your Contact Information

No matter what format you have chosen, your contact information must be at the top. Here’s what the list should contain and the order of the elements:

  • Full name
  • Phone number
  • Professional email address
  • Social media handles (like LinkedIn)
  • URLs to personal blogs or websites

Some would say that you should add you address too, but since you’re a remote worker it would have no relevance. The URLs you provide are similar to your extra-work portfolio. Putting them in the contact information section is the best way to direct the recruiter to your best work.

3. Write a Catchy Introduction of Yourself

Janice Fardel, the HR manager at one of the top rated resume writing services , notes that “Most remote workers find it hard to decide which information they should present at the beginning of their resumes. If you’re in that position, you should strive to capture your recruiter’s attention by telling a meaningful story, by stating interesting things, or by simply displaying your unique traits.

Therefore, to develop an inspirational resume, you should first ensure that you’re being truly relevant and interesting to the interviewer while introducing your personality, knowledge, and skills.

The recruiter will spend approximately 6 seconds to scan your resume and he will start from the top. So, if you don’t catch his attention, your chances are gone.

4. Add Both Your Professional and Academic Experience

The body of your resume should begin with the experience section, where you should list, in a chronological way, all your job history, starting with the beginning and ending with your actual position, and all your relevant professional achievements. For each job you had, you should provide further information. See here how.

Furthermore, the educational section should also follow a reverse chronological order. In this section, you should include the following:

  • The type of your degree
  • The minors and majors you’ve chosen to study
  • The university you attended
  • All the awards and honors you received in the past
  • All the remarkable achievements you’ve had during your academic years

5. Write a Skills Section

If you want to increase your chances of getting called for an interview, you should dedicate an entire section to your personal and professional skills. You should only include the skills that are truly relevant to the job position you’re applying for.

Besides skills, let the employer know what makes you a unique and valuable employee. Display your most powerful traits and tell why they should choose you instead of other candidates.

6. Tailor Your Resume Well

Tailoring your resume about researching the company you’re applying to, understanding their requirements and expectations, and tailoring your resume according to your specific job role in that company.

Why is this necessary? Well, imagine that a job offer may attract hundreds of candidates and with so many resumes to read, recruiters use Applicant Tracking System software.

This software takes your resume and compares it according to the job description and specific keywords. So, if you want your resume to pass the ATS software, you’d better tailor it well.

7. Finishing Touches

Sending a resume full of misspelled words and grammar issues will only prove your lack of professionalism.

Therefore, you’d better check it twice, use proofreading tools like Grammarly and Language Tool , or simply ask someone else to check it over.

Conclusion

Keep in mind that a truly good resume requires your full attention, focus, and time. Take our tips into consideration, contemplate on them, and most importantly, apply them whenever you write your next resume.

Source

https://blog.powertofly.com/remote-resume-help-2550454378.html

New Study Shows Remote Worker Trend on the Rise

Trends towards remote work are rising, with no end in sight. That’s according to a recent survey by Upwork. Today we will look at highlights of the survey, as well as get some answers about the topic from Upwork’s Zoe Harte, Senior Vice President of HR and Talent Innovation.

Source: GregorBister / iStock / Getty

You can check out the survey here.

Survey Highlights:

  • Ninety-one percent of hiring managers had open positions on their team at some point in 2017.
  • Positions are typically open for 36 days. Engineering positions were open for 45 days on average, and accounting and finance positions were open for 39 days on average.
  • More than three times as many hiring managers said that hiring was more difficult in 2017 than those who said it was easier.
  • The top hiring challenges in 2017 were access to skills (53%), cost and budgets (45%), and internal hiring processes (33%).
  • Fifty-two percent of hiring managers say that talent shortages are driving the adoption of more flexible models in the workplace.
  • Sixty-three percent of companies have remote workers, but 57% lack work-from-home policies.
  • Forty-eight percent of companies use freelancers, which is up 5% since last year.
  • Thirty-eight percent of survey-takers said that full-time/permanent employees will work largely from home.

Daily Advisor: According to your research, there has been a steady rise in remote workers. What has your research shown to be the major factor in the steady rise in remote workers?

Harte: Technology is fundamentally changing the way we work. Thanks to remote collaboration tools like Slack, Google Hangouts, and Atlassian, to name a few, it’s now possible to work without time and place restrictions. We’re no longer constrained by the walls of the office. While technology is the main enabler, another major force that must be recognized is that people recognize the ability to have more freedom and flexibility today, and they want to be able to work anytime, anywhere. In fact, the most talented professionals are increasingly used to being able to call the shots and shape their lives as they want to live them rather than as traditional 9-to-5 work required. This means that companies that want access to these talented pros need to allow remote work.

Daily Advisor: If the need to be flexible is being driven by the need for talent, what happens to the remote workforce if there are no longer talent shortages? In other words, are remote workforces only valuable because they help people fill their skill gaps?

Harte: The skills gap is not something that’s likely to go away anytime soon. Innovation is progressing faster than ever before. The underlying challenge for companies will be making sure there are enough people with the skills needed to support innovation. Technological and sociodemographic changes are shortening the shelf life of today’s skills. The World Economy Forum predicts that by 2020, more than 30% of the workforce’s essential skills will be new. Outside of access to skills, the other major benefit of having a remote workforce is the ability to scale teams up and down quickly to meet the demands of the business.

Daily Advisor: It was big news when IBM ended its work-from-home policies. What does it know that other companies don’t? What problem did it think it was solving by rolling back work-from-home policies?

Harte: IBM made the decision to colocate teams in what it claimed is an effort to inspire creativity and foster greater collaboration. While collaboration is a critical factor for success, location is not. Only 9% of hiring managers believe having a physical presence in the office is important to a new hire’s success. IBM’s decision to revoke its remote work policies was shortsighted, as its best talent will easily find new jobs with companies that are more open to remote work.

Daily Advisor: My understanding is that STEM workers, like those who would work at IBM, are in short supply. In your opinion, has IBM made a mistake by taking away the flexibility offered by allowing remote workers?

Harte: IBM’s reversal of its remote work policy was alarming and a big misstep. Remote work is not just the future but also the present. Forcing workers back into offices is archaic and a surefire way to lose your best talent. People today expect the freedom that technology provides. Not only do flexible work arrangements top job seekers’ lists of priorities but also making successful hires depends much more on relevant skills than on physical location. Companies that refuse to support a remote workforce risk losing their best people and turning away tomorrow’s top talent.

Daily Advisor: Working from home seems to go hand in hand with freelancers, contractors, and temporary staff. Your research shows a shift toward full-time and permanent employees being likely to work largely from home. Why is that?

Harte: The nature of work is changing. Employees are pushing companies to break down traditional time and place barriers that are relics of the Industrial Era and no longer make sense now that work can be done online. Flexible scheduling and work-from-home opportunities can be a major factor in an employee’s decision to take or leave a job. Innovative companies are realizing the value of nontraditional work models and are opting for more hybrid, flexible teams. In fact, 63% of companies today have remote team members. This will only continue to increase as companies see the benefits of remote work, including increased productivity and engagement.

In tomorrow’s Advisor, we’ll look at the rest of Harte’s answers, especially concerning workplaces without work-from-home policies. Additionally, we’ll look at their survey results infographic.

Telecommuting Tips: 5 things you may need to fix before telecommuting

telecommuting tips

 

If you’re willing to work for it, you can absolutely telecommute!

5 telecommuting tips. It’s a good idea to take a good look at your life before you dive into deep telecommuting waters. Some people may just not be cut out to do remote work. More often however, a few adjustments to your home office and lifestyle can unblock  hurdles to working from home.

Is your home office more of a party palace than a quite place to work? Do you have friends and family over at all times of the day and night? If so you may need to set some boundaries. Are you extroverted? Do you work better in a social environment? If so you should ask yourself if you can work alone in your home office. Do you need a boss leaning over your shoulder to keep you motivated? If so you may require some motivational training and have a serious talk with yourself about setting priorities.

telecommuting tips

If you are serious about telecommuting, and willing to make a commitment to a few lifestyle changes, then any personal roadblocks you may have can be turned into opportunities for personal growth. Make a plan, sit down with your spouse, close friends and family to realistically discuss what may need to change. Ask yourself if you are willing to do what needs to be done over the long haul. Most people will need to make a few physical and personal accomidations before entering the telecommuting lifestyle. All you really need however is a firm commitment and sincere drive to make it work.

If you do decide to take the telecommuting plunge, you can draw considerable encouragement in the fact that distance worker job opportunities are on the rise. It may be easier than you thought to find a remote position that matches your skill sets. Also, your current boss may be willing to let you work at home, at least part time, if you can explain why all sides can benefit.

Real Telecommuting Jobs

This video from five years ago about telecommuting derides Yahoo’s decision to limit telecommuting. The aruguments against Yahoo’s decision are as relevent, or more relevent today as they were then…

Telecommuting jobs are on the rise and are becoming mainstream. Besides real telecommuting jobs there are many scams that promise “work-from-home” gold mines, but these destract from legitimate opportunities that are available. Never use the term ‘work from home’ when searching for legitimate online positions as you will mostly find a website or article that will eventually lead you to click on a link that requires some sort of payment. Real telecommuting jobs will never ask you to pay anything upfront to do actual work.

Although there are real businesses that you can manage at home. most require a business license and real work including prospecting for clients, offering a real service or product, and managing all the ins and outs of a real business. If you are willing to do what it takes, then yes, you can have a business that you can operate anywhere.

Believe it or not there are a good number of ‘stay-at-home-moms’ who are looking to telecommute because their devotion to raising their children outweigh their drive for fullfillent as some corporate bot. To those ladies, here is a basic video on terms that are good to know when asking the boss for permission to telecommute…

Tellecommuting provides real benefits for both workers and employees. It decreases the costs and negative effects of normal commuting. It is environmentally friendly and has an indirect but positive effect on housing costs. It can also lessen the need for transportation  infrastructure costs and lessen the need for state and city taxes collected for repair and development of transportation systems.

Search legitimate telecommuting jobs HERE

 

Peter Thiel: Telecommuting a Solution to Rising Transportation and Housing Costs

American entrepreneur and venture capitalist Peter Thiel discusses the advantages of telecommuting in cities. Transportation and housing costs in large cities are growing and unsustainable. Thiel sees telecommuting as one viable solution to rising costs, traffic jams, commuter delays, and environmental pollution from vehicles. 

Thiel believes that telecommuting has suffered from the largely  incorrect assuption that telecommuters don’t work as hard. He suggests that new modes of telecommuting are developing than can be more efficient in the near future.

Telecommute Now – How to Get Quick Approval to Work from Home

So your company does not even have a telecommuting policy, but your really want to work from home. Never fear, this webinar shows how a few simple strategies has helped a good number of people convince their boss to allow them to telecommute. It may seem like you have to change the company’s policy to get what you want and that seems pretty dauting – but this is not always true. In many instances your firm does not have to change or create a policy. It’s just you who wants to work from home after all. 
 

Here are a number of strategies that you can deftly use to convince your manager to let you telecommute. There are convincing arguments you can use. After all, telecommuting has huge benefits for companies, advantages that have been proven though numerous studies. So don’t feel bad about asking for something that will benefit all concerned, if your boss knows you care about the welfare of the company, he or she will be obliged to listen to you.

Survey: Most Companies Lack a Telecommuting Policy. Here’s How to Get Yours Started.

A new report from Upwork, a freelancing website, found that while nearly two-thirds of companies have remote workers, less than half have a telecommuting policy.

This actually makes sense, because a lot of the time telecommuting start informally. Someone asks if they can work from home for a period of time, a manager says yes, and nothing is ever formalized. Then everybody sees the first person working from home and other people start asking and getting approvals.

This is all fine and good until a problem happens and you don’t have a policy in place. Sure, the best thing is if you have only responsible employees who are completely trustworthy, but that doesn’t always happen. You’ll end up with someone who says, “You didn’t say I couldn’t homeschool my children during the workday!” 

So, you need a policy. There isn’t a perfect policy for every business, of course. You have different needs and different clients, but here are five things you need to consider.

While you can and should certainly carve out an exception for a sick child, you need a policy that states that all children are either off-site in daycare or school, or have an onsite carer–whether that be your spouse or a babysitter. Some people think that an advantage of working from home is reduced daycare expenses, but you still need people to do their job and young children need someone watching them.

Of course, you need to be flexible–when a child is sick and can’t be sent to school or daycare, of course, your employee can combine work and child care. When an employee’s spouse, who normally does child care, wants to run out while the baby is sleeping, that should be allowed as well. But, there needs to be regular child care. Period.

This, of course, varies greatly from company to company and even job to job within the same company. Are your remote workers expected to start work precisely at 8:30 and take a 30-minute lunch break at noon, and then work up until 5:00? Or is it okay if they start at 5:30 am, take a 3-hour break from 11:00 to 2:00 and then come back to work? Or do you not care at all what hours they work as long as they get the work done?

Some companies institute core hours when everyone must be reachable and available but allow people to control the rest of their schedules. Some companies require that you be in communication at all times during the business day. Whatever works for your business is fine, but be clear. If you’re unclear, people will do things you don’t like, and then you have to talk with them about it and it can cause conflict and hurt feelings. Just start from the beginning saying, “this is how it is.” 

Does the company provide all the equipment? I’m not just talking about computers and smartphones. I’m talking desks, chairs, filing cabinets, headsets, pens, printers, and anything else your employee needs to do her job.

Lots of companies like telecommuting because they don’t have to pay for office space for all employees, but you should consider whether or not you’ll provide office equipment. And then how do you ensure you get it back should the employee quit or be fired? 

If you provide a printer, can the family use the printer or is work only? Can the employee use the company provided computer to write her novel? This is always an issue with BYOD, but when an employee works at home, it can further blur the line between work equipment and personal equipment.

Is it okay for your employee to work at the kitchen table? Does she need dedicated office space with a door that can be closed and locked? Does it need to be locked when the employee isn’t there? If not, how do you ensure data confidentiality?

If the employee exclusively works from home, can she move? How far from the office? Must she stay in the same state? Have less than a two-hour commute to the office? Can she move to a different country and keep her job? If she moves away, who pays for trips to the office, including transportation and hotel costs, when there is a mandatory onsite meeting?

How Are Telecommuting Arrangements Made?

Is there a formal approval process? If so, who does the approval? Is temporary telecommuting allowed with the manager’s approval but a permanent situation requires higher level approval? Is full-time remote work allowed, or only a few days per week? How many days per week is a “few”? Two? Three?

Obviously, some of these things are very job dependent, so you’ll need to consider departmental discretion, but all these things need to be dealt with before an employee starts to work from home on a regular basis. Otherwise, things can fall apart.

Source

https://www.inc.com/suzanne-lucas/survey-most-companies-lack-a-telecommuting-policy-heres-how-to-get-yours-started.html

Telecommuting Rises 115%

If it seems that telecommuting, or virtual work, is more popular than ever, it’s not hard to see why: a new report from Global Workplace Analytics (GWA) and FlexJobs shows that it has grown by 115% in the past decade.

And it shows no signs of slowing. In fact, GWA also reports that 50% of the US workforce holds a job compatible with at least partial teleworking, and that 80 to 90% of the workforce would like to work remotely at least part-time.

Part of the reason stems from the fact that 80% of married millennials have a dual-income household that leaves little time for recreation – so any time gained by working from home is attractive. In fact, as millennials make up more of the workforce, employers are using flex work to attract top talent that might balk at the idea of having to go to an office every day of the week.

Key elements of virtual team building

As more companies embrace virtual work, however, they discover that many of the benefits outlined by GWA fail to materialize, and that their teams exhibit a number of negative characteristics outlined in a Forbes report:

GWA Benefits of Virtual Teams

  • Employers can save $11,000 per half-time telecommuter per year
  • Half-time telecommuters gain 11 days back per year – time they would have spent commuting
  • Absenteeism decrease of 31% with half-time telecommuting
  • Increase in productivity and morale
  • Increase in loyalty to employer
  • Organizational agility
  • Improved work-life balance

Forbes Challenges of Virtual Teams

  • Feelings of isolation
  • Lack of social interaction
  • Low levels of trust
  • Miscommunication and cultural clashes
  • Loss of team spirit

As GWA notes, it is only “well-executed programs” that can help employers achieve the desired benefits.

Keys to managing virtual teams

The question for today’s employers is this: Are you ready to transition from a face-to-face model to a virtual one? To help answer that question, consider the following:

  1. Working virtually means more than taking a laptop home – it requires a culture change that embraces digital workflow and communications tools that maximize productivity and teamwork across distances.
  2. Well-executed virtual teams take the time to learn communications strategies and techniques that build trust and camaraderie without ever being in the same room.
  3. Effective virtual teams have well-defined processes, accountabilities and methodologies that streamline and simplify workflow.

In short, simply offering flex work may get the employees you want in the door, but without investing in the skills and processes that make virtual teams perform, those same employees may not deliver the results you expect or stick around for long.

A great way to set your virtual teams up for success start is with an assessment from Virtual Team Builders. Your business can thrive in a virtual, telecommuting world – and we can help.

Source

http://virtualteambuilders.com/telecommuting-rises-115-in-past-decade/